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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
they say is a scan eagle drone made by boeing iran says the drone was spying and the iranian navy brought it down hacking into electronics. the u.s. navy says it's not missing a drone in the middle east. i'm joined by elise in washington. first u.s. far from the only country to possess drones neen that part of the world, multiple countries do. could the aircraft belong to someone else? >> well, certainly, michael. the u.s. says none of its drones are missing and it follows it could belong to someone else. the united states has identify the 76 countries that use this type of drone country and many u.s. allies in the persian gulf are also using it. but it's unclear how iran got a hold of it anyway. it's possible that it got lost or it had a mechanical failure. it's not clear that it shot down. >> exactly. one of the questions that's been asked, and they've claimed to have done this before, in fact this announcement comes a day to the -- a year to the day after iran claimed to have shot down another u.s. drone and they say that one crashed in the iranian desert. >> that's right. it's a great
states navy says it's not one of our drones. iran's revolutionary guard says it has captured one of our prized pieces of intelligence, something called a scan eagle. iran says it was brought down by anti-aircraft squads in iranian air space. there's no visible damage in the pictures that aired today on iranian tv, and, again, the u.s. navy, which patrols the persian gulf constantly, says all ever its drones are currently accounted for. it also says its drones stay in international air space. joining me now with his insights and expertise is jim walsh. jim, first and foremost, look, it may very well be someone else's drone. i'll get to that in a moment. but when we say we only patrol in international air space, do we really only patrol in international air space? >> well, the first thing to know about that ashleigh, is international air space is highly contested. different countries draw the maps in different ways. and so you can be in a spot in the air where one country claims it's in international air space and another country claims it's in their national air space. it's sort of a fud
-year veteran of the navy accused tonight of being a spy. why officials think he was leaking crucial secrets to the russians and as two states prepare to -- sir richard bransens tells us why the war on drugs has been an utter failure. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ tdd#: 1-800-345-2550
source, howard dean. does the former vermont governor's plan add up? plus, a former u.s. navy sailor charged with attempted espy naj tonight. the alleged benefactor was russia. the war on drugs? have we lost it? let's go "outfront." good evening. a bright idea brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. the man who brought us the scream heard round the world when he ran for president. yeah! >> dean says let's face it, america. taxes need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows most people like the president's ideas of only raising taxes on other people, specifically the top 2%. individuals making over $200,000 a year or families making over $250,000 a year. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years. remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt hole. if we go with howard dean's ide
so, so the big question is how would he know all that? he spent more than 20 years in the navy. he worked in the intelligence field. he was a submarine warfare specialist. he had not only a top secret clearance, but also authorizes for what's called special access, which limits the amount of people who can view highly sensitive material. he had that access. he hadn't been out of the navy for more than a year when fbi agents started tracking him and set up this sting and this undercover operation, and that's how they caught him. >> we know if there was any classified information that was actually released? >> reporter: no. there were never actually any real russian agents, so to speak. these were all undercover agents, b it is very, very serious. i mean, the navy will almost always tell you exactly where their carriers and surface ships are located in any given moment. they never reveal the location of the submarine. that is a highly classified part of the u.s. navy. he faces life in prison if he is convicted of this charge. >> wow. okay. chris, thank you. appreciate it. >>> photogr
ahead of it. >> reporter: just this week, the navy tested its next generation drone, which could carry bombs and lands on an aircraft carrier with hardly any human control. the directive only applies to lethal systems. it still allows the military to develop autonomous spy planes. >> as we begin to approach the possibility of having machines select and engage targets, we want to be very careful not to cross that line without high-level policy review. >> reporter: human rights watcher applauds the pentagon's move. >> we don't believe it solves the problem, however. >> reporter: so the group is calling for governments to ban autonomous weapons outright. bonnie points to syria and wonders what killer robots could do in a conflict like that. >> because the weapons are emotionless, they could serve as a perfect tool for a dictator who would not have to worry about the danger of a human soldier turning on him if ordered to fire on his own civilians. a robot would not do that. >> reporter: when you're talking about a weapon that doesn't have the capacity to feel any compassion for its victims
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)